Tag Archives: pop surrealism

The Poison Garden

The Poisoned Garden

This weekend, Kari-Lise and I will head to Portland, Oregon for the opening of VEILS at Talon Gallery where Kari-Lise will be debuting the first five pieces from her 2018 series, The Poisoned Garden. The show opens on Saturday, February 17th, and we’ll both be in attendance. If you live in Portland or the surrounding area come on by and say hello. We’d love to see you. The opening reception is from 6pm–9pm. The exhibition will be on display through March 12th, 2017, and it is both free and open to the public.

I’m so stoked this is finally reaching the public. There is a narrative aspect to The Poisoned Garden that really draws me in as a storyteller, and the series is shaping up to be a favorite. Kari-Lise is really throwing herself into the work, and it shows. Afterwards, you’ll be able to view all the pieces at Talon Gallery’s website, feel free to contact the gallery directly to inquire about any particular piece. I’m excited the initial debut of The Poisoned Garden is finally seeing the light of day.

Kari-Lise Alexander — “The Find” (Detail)
Kari-Lise Alexander — “The Find” (Detail)

Kari-Lise Alexander [Left] “Summer Dream” 10″x10″, Oil on Panel [Right] “Alone Amongst the Irises” in the studio
Kari-Lise Alexander — [Left] “Summer Dream” 10″x10″, Oil on Panel [Right] “Alone Amongst the Irises” in the studio
There are a few more pieces in this set that I’m not previewing here. To see them you’ll need to subscribe to Kari-Lise’s newsletter or come to the show. A collector’s preview is coming later this week, it’s easy to sign up: click here to subscribe.


🎬 Overlooked Details

If you haven’t taken the time, make sure to watch the short documentary about Kari-Lise’s work: Overlooked Details, An Artist’s Journey, directed, edited, and filmed by Scott R. Wilson. (It partially documents her work on Inflorescence.) It’s fifteen minutes long and very much worth your time. It’s a raw, heartfelt, and vulnerable glimpse into her journey. I’ve embedded it below, and I recommend watching it full screen. You can view the full credits here.


🖼 Previous Work

Interested in seeing Kari-Lise’s previous shows? I’ve written about them before, and I’d encourage you to check them out, there is some excellent work, but it’s also amazing to document her growth as an artist:


See you Saturday, Portland!

✨🎨✨

Kari-Lise Alexander's WAKE

WAKE [Update]

As I posted previously, I spent the weekend in Los Angeles, California for the launch of Kari-Lise’s latest body of work, WAKE. While I’ll have more to share about the trip in the future, I wanted to write a quick update letting everyone know that the whole show is now available to view online! Just click below and check it out. It’s incredible.


View WAKE at Thinkspace Gallery ↦


This was Kari-Lise’s first show in the L.A. market, and it was great to see so much support. The crew at the gallery were wonderful. The show looks amazing in the space. I was telling a friend this morning that it was nice to see the pieces hanging on a proper wall. A few fans even made treks from San Francisco and San Deigo to check out the show! Our trip was a blast and it was a whirlwind of a weekend.

Opening Night at Thinkspace Gallery
Opening night at Thinkspace Gallery

If you’re in LA, go check it out. The show will be on display until April 22nd. You can also read more about WAKE and Kari-Lise’s work at any of the links below:

Kari-Lise Alexander's WAKE

WAKE

This weekend, Kari-Lise and I will head to Los Angeles for the opening of her latest show, WAKE at Thinkspace Gallery. The show opens on Saturday, April 1st, and we’ll both be there. If you live in L.A. come on by and say hello. We’d love to see you. The opening reception is from 6pm–9pm. The exhibition will be on display through April 22, 2017, and it is both free and open to the public.

For the last year, I have watched Kari-Lise work through the creation of this show, and I have been amazed by the outcome. I couldn’t be more proud. After launch, you’ll be able to view the full show at Thinkspace Gallery’s website, feel free to contact the gallery directly to inquire about any particular piece. Kari-Lise is also sending out a collector preview to anyone subscribed to her newsletter, subscribe here. I’m excited for WAKE to finally launch so everyone else can enjoy the series. There’s a lot to love.

Night Garden in the Studio
Kari-Lise Alexander — “Night Garden” in the studio
[Left] <em>"Surface"</em> 2016, 12"x12", Oil on Panel [Right] "Wake" 2016, 36"x 36", Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander — [Left] “Surface” 12″x12″, Oil on Panel [Right] “Wake” 36″x 36″, Oil on Panel
Coyote in the Studio
Kari-Lise Alexander — “Coyote” in the studio
Kari-Lise Alexander "The Arrow" 24"x12", Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander — “The Arrow” 24″x12″, Oil on Panel

If you’re interested in the work from Kari-Lise’s previous shows, I’ve written about them before, and I’d encourage you to check them out. In late 2015 she released A Lovelorn Theft, earlier that year she shared her 2014 work in Inflorescence. She’s had other shows as well, and you can see these and more of her past work at her website, kari-lise.com.


If you haven’t taken the time, make sure to watch Overlooked Details, An Artist’s Journey, it’s the short documentary about her work, filmed by Scott R. Wilson. (It partially documents her work on Inflorescence.) It’s very much with your time and is an amazing glimpse into her journey. I’ve embedded it below, and I recommend watching it full screen. You can view the full credits here.

A Lovelorn Theft

A Lovelorn Theft

This weekend Kari-Lise and I are heading down to sunny San Francisco to attend the opening of her latest series: A Lovelorn Theft, at Modern Eden Gallery. The show opens on Saturday, September 12th, and we’ll both be there. If you live in the area come on by and say hello. The opening reception is from 6pm–9pm. The exhibition will be on display through October 3, 2015, and it is both free and open to the public.

Kari-Lise Alexander's "The Bathing Silver Swan" in the studio
Kari-Lise Alexander’s “The Bathing Silver Swan” in the studio

I absolutely love this series. A Lovelorn Theft was inspired by the swan maidens and selkies of Nordic folklore. Each piece places the viewer in the intimate role of a lovelorn voyeur, who spies these beautiful creatures for the first time. The work itself is stunning combining the styles of the Pre-Raphaelite movement with new contemporary and pop surrealism. It’s been fascinating to watch Kari-Lise develop this series over the last year, I’m so excited the public is now getting a chance to see them together. In my opinion, it’s her best work yet.

Like her last show, Inflorescence, this series has also been garnering a lot of great press all over the internet. Kari-Lise was once again featured on High Fructose, and This Isn’t Happiness. For those interested, she was also interviewed by Modern Eden, she talks about her work, her inspirations, and you can see a picture of our two bunnies cuddling.

You can see the full show on Modern Eden’s website after it opens, or email Kim at Modern Eden and request a collectors preview. The links above also has a majority of the work. I’ve posted a few of my favorites below. Which is your favorite?

Stealing Softly Forth
Kari-Lise Alexander —”Stealing Softly Forth” 2015, Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander —"The Reveal" 2015, Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander —”The Reveal” 2015, Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander —"Lady of the River" 2015, Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander —”Lady of the River” 2015, Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander —"Waterborne" 2015, Oil on Panel
Kari-Lise Alexander —”Waterborne” 2015, Oil on Panel

 

Friday Link Pack 07/02/2015

It’s an extra-large holiday weekend here in the States. Why not celebrate it with an extra-large Friday Link Pack! Some of these links I mention on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Have a link I should feature in the upcoming link pack? Click here to email me and let me know! (Include a website so I can link to you as well.) Let’s get to it…

WRITING:

Amazon Sues To Block Fake Reviews On Its Site
This article is a few months old, but it somehow flew below my radar. It’s nice to see Amazon taking some steps towards removing this practice. Never, ever, ever, EVER, pay for reviews. They are as unfair to your readers as they are to you.

Mad Max: Fury Road And The Art Of Worldbuilding
I loved Mad Max: Fury Road. It’s easily my favorite movie of 2015. In this article, I go into depth on how director George Miller created such a wonderfully thought out action flick, with deep well-developed characters, and a breakneck pace.

Gay Vampires And Bisexual Cowboys: Why Erotica Gas E-Readers To Thank
The Guardian looks into the growing popularity of the erotica genre and the correlation with the rise of e-readers and the privacy afforded by them. There’s also a bit that goes into the psyche of readers of erotism. Personally, it feels stifling as an author. I’d hate to try something different and have my audience revolt.

Online Is IRL
Chuck Wendig wrote this piece in response to the backlash erotica writer E.L. James received on Twitter during her #AskELJames hashtag campaign. It’s some good thoughts surrounding how we treat one another online and how as critics we should always focus on the work, and not the creator themselves. [Note: Wendig later withdrew this statement. I’m not really sure why? Because he’s a man, I guess? All I see is one author stepping forward in the defense of a fellow author. YMMV, the initial article is still great.]

The Modern History Of Swearing: Where All The Dirtiest Words Come From
If you have been reading my blog for some time you’ll note that I am a fan of etymology and the evolution of words. This article from Salon delves into the histories of some of today’s dirtier words.

ART:

The Anamorphic Graffiti Of Odeith
While anamorphic street art is always fun, Odeith takes it to the next level. I particularly like it when paint is used on the ground to help take that 3D effect to new places.

Yes, Androids Do Dream Of Electric Sheep
So, Google set up a feedback loop in its image recognition neural network. The result were these strange hallucinatory images of animals, buildings, people, and landscapes. Beautiful, maybe. Terrifying, absolutely.

The Corey Press
Lovecraftian woodblock prints created by Drew Meger in Salem, MA. Really love all of these (the Nyarlathotep piece, Sage of the Sands, is my favorite.) If you like what you see, make sure you check out his Etsy store. (I featured Entfuhrentanz, Die Herzogin, for the featured image this week.)

Kisung Koh, Recent Work
My own art tastes have veered away from animals over the last few years. However, there was something incredible about these recent pieces from Canadian artist Kisung Koh. They go beyond your typical paintings of animals and into something else entirely.

RANDOM:

Go Play Gran Text Auto
Yesterday, a friend of mine launched his new game for iOS. It’s part driving and part texting. It’s fantastic, hilarious, and free! I highly recommend checking it out. iOS only for now. Here’s the link to download.

The 6 Alien Species Currently Fighting for Control Over Earth
Well, this is certainly… er, interesting. I’ll leave it up to you to decide if the blog post is serious or not. [Thanks for Will from Dorkshelf and Art of the Title sharing this.]

Netflix Is About to Be Bigger Than ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox
It’s a banner day… er, decade, really… for new media, and Netflix is the vanguard. You know those execs who never thought Netflix was going to make it are kicking themselves right now. And to thin, Netflix used to be the company that shipped DVDs to people.

9 Creatures So Unfathomable They’re Named After Monsters
We’ve already looked at the six species of aliens fighting over our planet. Let’s look at what they’ll inherit! Atlas Obscura (my favorite blog) lays out this strange menagerie. Creatures named after the hydra, to flying dragons, to the goblin spider.

Dice-Shaming
We’ve all been there. We’re fighting a monster, trying to pick a lock, or rolling to see how successful one of our abilities are… and… epic fail. Well, the gamers over at blastr have put together this slideshow of 27 dice that didn’t behave and the consequences their poor rolls wrought on the outcome of the game.

WEIRD WIKIPEDIA:

Raven Paradox
“The raven paradox, also known as Hempel’s paradox or Hempel’s ravens, is a paradox arising from the question of what constitutes evidence for a statement. Observing objects that are neither black nor ravens may formally increase the likelihood that all ravens are black – even though, intuitively, these observations are unrelated.”

H.P. LOVECRAFT STORY OF THE WEEK:

He
A man begrudgingly moves to a new town, and while wandering the streets at night he meets a mysterious stranger who begins to show him visions. Some interesting connections to Lovecraft’s personal life and his racism in this story. I highly recommend checking out the Wikipedia page for He.

GIF OF THE WEEK:

Crows gunna crow.

Inflorescence, A Series of Paintings by Kari-Lise Alexander

Inflorescence

I’m so excited to finally share Kari-Lise’s latest series, Inflorescence with all of you. It has been a labor of love. I’ve watched her working in her studio for months, creating what I feel is her best series yet.

If you follow me on Twitter you know she’s been getting a ton of positive press. Her work has been featured on the Beautiful Bizzare blog, Hi-Fructose’s blog, and even on my favorite Tumblr blog: This Isn’t Happiness.

Last week I posted Scott Wilson’s documentary about her, Overlooked Details, An Artist’s Journey. It gives you a small glimpse into how much time and effort she pours into each of these pieces. Her hard work really shows. I’m so proud of what she has accomplished and I’m excited these are finally out in the wild and available for all to see!

Inflorescence officially opens on Feburary 14th at Distinction Gallery in Escondido, California. We’ll both be there so if you’re in the area, stop by and say hello. I’ve posted some of my favorite pieces below, but I highly recommend checking out the full series over at Distinction’s website.

Inflorescence by Kari-Lise Alexander
Kari-Lise Alexander — “Inflorescence” 2014, Oil on Panel
Fauna Flora by Kari-Lise Alexander
Kari-Lise Alexander — “Fauna Flora” 2014, Oil on Panel
Shallow by Kari-Lise Alexander
Kari-Lise Alexander — “Shallow” 2014, Oil on Panel

See The Rest Of The Show Here →