Tag Archives: Moon

Friday Link Pack 02/27/2015

It’s Friday! That means it’s time to share a few links I’ve found over the last few days. Some of these I mention on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Have a link I should feature in the upcoming link pack? Click here to email me and let me know! (Include a website so I can link to you as well.) Away we gooooo…

Writing:

Publishers Bypass Literary Agents To Discover Bestseller Talent
With the market currently in flux this isn’t really all that surprising. Just make sure to get a good contract lawyer.

10 Famous Writers’ Houses Worth Visiting
Planning a trip? Mental Floss assembles a top ten list of former abodes of classic authors, from Hemingway’s, to Dickenson’s, to Twain’s. Is it just me or did all these folks have huge houses?

Best-Sellers Initially Rejected
Rejection is apart of every writer’s life, and I mean every writer. Check out this list of enormous hits that were rejected by publishers.

Upcoming Appearances
This week I launched a new section on the site. Interested in meeting me? Want to pick up a signed copy from me directly? Under the “Appearances” tab you’ll find a handy list of the future conventions, readings, and appearances that I’ll be making.

Art:

Mir
This Norwegian firm specializes in the portrayal of “unbuilt architecture” through a technique they call “natural visualisation.” Simply stunning.

Random:

Five Things I Didn’t Get About Making Video Games (Until I Did It)
Before he got into the industry, Anthony Burch was a reviewer of video games. In this article he explains the separation that exists between reviews and actually development. While this piece focuses on games, this article could be written for any creative endeavor. As consumers it’s easy to forget how much time, blood, sweat, and tears go into something creative from games to art to books to music. It’s hard work, even if you hate it.

Why I’m Volunteering to Die on Mars
Fascinating piece from Sonia Van Meter, one of the Mars One 100, about leaving earth and going to live on Mars… permanently.

Yoga Fhtagn
So you’re a newly minted health goth looking for a fresh Lovecraftian take on yoga? Well, look no further, YouTuber Laurie Penny has you covered.

Earth’s Other ‘Moon’ And Its Crazy Orbit
Did you know Earth had another smaller (and drunker) moon? Well it does!

Random Wikipedia Article of the Week:

Wherein I got to Wikipedia and hit Random Article until I find something good/weird/offensive/hilarious/interesting/etc. This weeks entry:

Aerocar
Aerocar International’s Aerocar (often called the Taylor Aerocar) was an American roadable aircraft, designed and built by Moulton Taylor in Longview, Washington, in 1949. Although six examples were built, the Aerocar never entered production.

Lovecraft Story of the Week:

The Disinterment
Things aren’t always what they seem…

Gif of the Week:

Me, everyday.

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Friday Link Pack—End of the Year Edition (2013)

Medieval & Renaissance  Cartographic Sea Monsters

Every Friday I compile a list of my favorite links I’ve seen throughout the week. Since this is the last Friday of the year I figured I’d go back and see what interested you the most and combine them into an End of Year Edition that featured the most popular links. Have a link I should feature in the upcoming year? Let me know!

Writing:

Random Story Title Generator
The name says it all, while the results are often silly I do find it great for brainstorming. Let me know when your first edition of: “Madman Fights Desert” hits bookstores. I’ll be at the front of the line.

12 Real Life Inventions That Science Fiction is Neglecting at its Peril
One of my favorite bloggers, Charlie Jane Anders, compiled a list of real life inventions that has been neglected by modern science fiction. If you’re looking for some inspiration for your own project look no further. There’s a lot here.

The Best Symbols To Throw Some Scare Into Your Story
I am a huge fan of symbolism. I think it can add an extra layer of depth for the readers willing to do the leg work. It also creates a richer experience overall. In this post Lauren shared a few spooky symbols you can add to your own writing. No surprise this made the list. Lauren’s posts are always amazing.

Art:

Jason Thompson’s “Lovecraft’s Dream Quest”
There was a lot of interest in this visual retelling of Lovecraft’s Dream Cycle. Not only is it beautiful but Thompson’s style has a level of detail rarely seen in the webcomic space. Worth spending time with.

Sean Cumiskey’s Fan Art for The Stars Were Right
I loved this piece when Sean sent it to me. I still love it today. Dark, moody, engaging. Apparently you all liked it as much as me.

Heath Lewis’ Wowly Heck
Heath Lewis (who created some awesome fan art) also started Wowly Heck—his experimental blog featuring new spins on some amazing monsters that you all loved. Very cool stuff.

Random:

Behold, the Moon as you’ve never seen it before
It’s a rad animated gif of the Moon! Who doesn’t love the moon!?

8 Ruined Cities That Remain a Mystery to This Day
io9‘s list of ruined cities is not only fascinating but also a great way to awaken your inner Indiana Jones. (Like your inner Indiana Jones was ever asleep.)

Medieval & Renaissance Cartographic Sea Monsters
BibliOdyssey’s great post exploring the subject of monsters on old maps. It includes some great high-resolution scans of the creatures: Renaissance-style dolphins with strange ducks bills, horned whales devouring ships, even the elusive marine chicken.

Lovecraft Story of the Year:

Unda; or, The Bride of the Sea
I was feeling a bit nautical when I selected this poem, apparently you all were as well. Out of all the “Lovecraft Story of the Week” it generated the most interest.

Farewell Gif of the Year:

Good ol' Ford

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