Tag Archives: Kameron Hurley

Friday Link Pack 09/04/2015

Friday Link Pack — End of the Year Edition (2015)

Happy New Year! Well, we’re finally here, at the end of all things. Okay, not the end of all things, just the end of the Friday Link Pack. As I mentioned earlier in December, this will be the last Link Pack going forward. [Details Here.] We’ve reached number one-hundred, and it just so happens to be the official End of the Year Edition! [Previous years: 2014, 2013] In this, I compile the best-loved links I’ve shared over 2015 into one big post. As always, some of these I’ve mentioned on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Even though the Link Pack is ending on the blog I’ll still continue to share stuff I find interesting on Twitter.

All right, let’s see which links you liked the most:

My Most Popular Posts Of 2015:

Map of the Known Territories
The official map to the Bell Forging Cycle has been getting a bunch of interest ever since I shared it in August. The biggest version of the map was also one of the most clicked images on the entire site. Glad everyone likes it so much. [Attn: map contains some minor Old Broken Road spoilers.]

The 2015 Lovecraft-Inspired Gift Guide
Put together this post in early December and every loved it. (Big thanks to everyone over on r/Lovecraft and r/Cthulhu.) Gifts for the Lovecraft fan on your list, or of course, yourself. A whole slew of books, music, games, and a lot more. If you’re looking for a place to spend some of that Christmas cash, look no further.

Mad Max and the Art of Worldbuilding
I’m happy to see how much everyone enjoyed my look at worldbuilding from the viewpoint of one of my favorite movies of the year, Mad Max: Fury Road. I have another article in the works following this up.


Note: I also got a lot of traffic to my Mysterious Package posts. However after some emails and not wanting to spoil things for others I elected to remove them from my site. That is why they aren’t featured on today’s list.


Most Clicked Writing Links Of 2015:

What I Get Paid For My Novels: Or, Why I’m Not Quitting My Day Job
Novelist Kameron Hurley opens up and shares how much she has made on each of her books. It’s a fantastic post. Awesome to see transparency like this. I think this is good info for every author, indie or traditional, it helps set the record straight.

Cognition as Ideology: A Dialectic of SF Theory
In January, I shared this wonderful talk from China Miéville regarding the importance of fantasy in our modern society. I highly recommend it to anyone who reads or writes speculative fiction.

Why Horror Is Good For You (And Even Better For Your Kids)
Artist Greg Ruth gives us six fantastic reasons why we should all read horror. I’m really happy this was so well received, it’s still one of my favorite articles I shared this year.

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing
I have long been a fan of writer’s personal lists of rules. It’s always good to glean what you can apply to your list (and yeah, we all have our personal list.) Neil Gaiman is no exception. (Note #5.)

10 Twenty-First Century Bestsellers People Tried to Ban (and Why)
The stories behind people trying to ban books are always fascinating to me. History has proven that when one tries to impose prohibition, the effect is usually opposite of the intent. What was it Mark Twain said? Oh yeah: “Nothing so needs reforming as other people’s habits. Fanatics will never learn that, though it be written in letters of gold across the sky. It is the prohibition that makes anything precious.”


Most Clicked Art Links Of 2015:

Kari-Lise Alexander Paints Nordic Beauties In “A Lovelorn Theft”
Kari-Lise’s latest solo show opened at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco at the end of September, and a lot of folks were interested in seeing her work. In this post, High Fructose highlighted many of the pieces from that show. After watching the series develop throughout 2015, I was excited to see it in the wild. I’m sure you’ll agree this series is gorgeous.

Women Trying To Sleep Unsuccessfully In Western Art History
For hundreds of years,  women in art have been trying to take a break and catch some Zs. For whatever reason no one wants to let them. Art is weird.

Korean Artist Beautifully Illustrates What Real Love Looks Like
I loved these sweet little illustrations by Puuung, and so did you. Small touching moments rendered beautifully. Each tells its own story. [Thanks again to Stalara for sharing.]

I See Music Because I Have Synesthesia, So I Decided To Paint What I Hear
Painter Melissa McCracken is a synesthete. When she hears music it comes to her in a variety of colors. Instead of trying to describe what she sees she has decided to paint it instead. The results are fascinating.


Most Clicked Random Links of 2015:

20 Maps That Never Happened
From war plans for the invasion of Canada to the fifty states redrawn with equal populations, Vox explores twenty imaginary maps. You know, I’d be cool living in the state of Rainer.

Abandoned Indonesian Church Shaped Like a Massive Clucking Chicken
Some people do strange things to get messages from God; things like building a strangely shaped church in the middle of the jungle. Apparently the builder had intended it to look like a dove, but it’s clearly a chicken.

Arcology: Cutaways Of The Future City-Hives That Never Were
The futurist idea of arcologies is a mainstay of science fiction. I even play with the concept in the Bell Forging books. So when I saw this post from Cory Doctorow about Paolo Soleri’s 1969 book: Arcology: The City in the Image of Man. It was something I was very interested in. The book sounds fascinating, but the images… you need to see the images. [Thanks again to Steve for sharing this.]

I Won A $5,000 Magic: The Gathering Tournament On Shrooms
I’ve never done shrooms, but this article is hilarious regardless. As my friend Rob pointed out, this is the Magic: The Gathering version of James Blagden’s Dock Ellis & The LSD No-No. [Thanks to Rob for sharing this.]


Most Clicked Weird Wikipedia Link of 2015:

After watching the video, I’d wager it’s safe to say that this is probably one of the more creepy Weird Wikipedia links in 2015. Check out the article and make sure to turn the captions on, makes it that much more effective.

Max Headroom Broadcast Signal Intrusion
“The Max Headroom broadcast signal intrusion was a television signal hijacking that occurred in Chicago, Illinois, United States on the evening of November 22, 1987. It is an example of what is known in the television business as broadcast signal intrusion. The intruder was successful in interrupting two broadcast television stations within the course of three hours. The hijackers were never identified.”

Make sure you watch the video as well:


Lovecraft Story Of The Year:

The Shadow over Innsmouth
Yay! My favorite Lovecraft story was also YOUR favorite. Happy to see this listed as the story of the year. It’s a good one. [Fun Fact: the Innsmouth folk served as the source of inspiration for the anur in my books.]


Animated GIF Of The Year:

I can't get enough GIFs of robot struggling to play soccer/football.

The Scupltures of Bailey Henderson

Friday Link Pack 01-30-2015

Friday is upon us! It’s time to share a few links I’ve found over the last few days. Some of these I mention on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Have a link I should feature in the upcoming link pack? Click here to email me and let me know! All right, let’s get to it…

Writing:

What I Get Paid For My Novels: Or, Why I’m Not Quitting My Day Job
Novelist Kameron Hurley opens up and shares how much she has made on each of her books. It’s a fantastic post. Awesome to see transparency like this. I think this is good info for every author, indie or traditional, it helps set the record straight.

The Last Taboo: What One Writer Earns
I guess this week is about finances. Erotica writer Cara McKenna shares how much she makes from her writing. It’s cool to see more and more writers share like this. I think many new authors assume writing = huge payout which doesn’t match reality.

9 Famous Authors’ Favorite Workday Snacks
From Balzac, to King, to Lovecraft. Mental Floss compiles the go-to snacks when these famous authors had the munchies. (Spoiler, it’s a lot of coffee.)

How To Tell If You Are In A Soft Science Fiction Novel
The Toast shares some tips on how to know if the book you’re reading is soft sci-fi. [Thanks to Steve for sharing this one with me.]

Art:

Coming Soon: Overlooked Details
I’m really excited to announce the soon-to-be released documentary by filmmaker Scott Wilson focusing on my wife, Kari-Lise Alexander (if you haven’t seen her work, you should check it out.)

Bailey Henderson’s Sculptures
You know those strange monsters on old maps? Well, Toronto based sculpture artist Bailey Henderson creates beautiful and highly detailed sculptures based on those very creatures. [Thanks again goes to Steve for this submission as well.]

The Art Of Marissa Buschow
Artist and biologist Marissa Buschow makes beautiful moku hanga pieces (traditional woodblock printing using water based pigments) based on birds she studies as a biologist. It’s stunning stuff. You can buy her work here.

Random:

If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say, SAY IT IN ALL CAPS
This American Life knocked it out of the park with last weeks show. Especially the piece from Lindy West about confronting an internet troll who harassed her and then later apologized. Fantastic episode.

Interactive Map of Earth’s Vegetation Rendered Through NASA Satellite
Beautiful. NOAA recently released this map, utilizing a year’s worth of data, and rendering all the plant life on earth. Zoom in and check out your neighborhood.

Weather Map Freakout
Amusing video of a weather report after the map freaks out and reports unusually high temperatures.

Lovecraft Story of the Week:

He
“I saw him on a sleepless night when I was walking desperately to save my soul and my vision…”

Gif of the Week:

In Peter we trust
#GOHAWKS

Friday Link Pack 06/20/14

Dina Goldstein's "Fallen Princesses"It’s time to share a few interesting links I have found throughout the week. Some of these I mention on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Have a link I should feature in the upcoming link pack? Let me know!

Writing:

Busting Down The Romantic Myth Of Writing Fiction & Mitigating Burnout
Kameron Hurley who wrote the fantastic Bel Dame Apocrypha series (check it out) really lays out the reality of being an author in her article for Locus Online. I appreciate her candor, this is something every author or aspiring author should read.

We Are Losing The Art Of Reading
Has our consumption culture changed the way we as a society reads? Andy Miller explores this idea in his piece for The Guardian.

Langston Hughes & The Harlem Renaissance
A great video from John Green and the team at Crash Course takes a look at the poet Langston Hughes and his impact on literature during the Harlem Renaissance. I really enjoy all of the Crash Course videos but this one stood out. It’s a solid 11:31 and worth every moment.

David Farland’s Daily Kick in the Pants—Chapter Titles
A good chapter title can do a lot for your story. Dave Farland once again offers his sage advice on how to effectively use chapter titles.

I’m having a Kindle Sale!
For the next month The Stars Were Right is available for only $1.99! Now is a good chance for Kindle owners to pick up a copy. Click here for more info. Tell your friends!

Art:

Dina Goldstein’s Fallen Princesses
A bit of the American underbelly and a dash of Disney and you have photographer Dina Goldstein’s latest series Fallen Princesses. In these works the classic Disney icons are viewed through a lens not typically associated with their character. Good stuff. (Thanks to Kari-Lise for the tip.)

Buda Repossession
This full recreation of Hungarian painter Benczúr Gyula‘s Budavár Repossession in 3D is something that has to be seen. Incredible.

Dexter Maurer
I fell in love with these illustrations from swiss artist Dexter Maurer. It has the right blend of both whimsy and strangeness.

Random:

Spending Stephen King’s Money
In 2006 author Emily Schultz released Joyland. This year Stephen King released a book with the same title. This caused confusion among Amazon users who ended up leaving negative reviews. But there is a silver lining to all of this: there were A LOT of confused readers so Schultz ended up with a pretty big royalty check. So, like anyone, she decided to start a blog documenting how she’s spending Stephen King’s money. (Thanks to Lola for sharing this one.)

The successful 70-year campaign to convince people the USA and not the USSR beat Hitler
It was Russia who rolled into Berlin and ended the the European Theater portion of WW2 in the final major offensive. For a long time, people thought they deserved the credit, but that has slowly changed. Vox examines the details behind this shift in people’s perception.

Lovecraft Story of the Week:

Dagon
One of Lovecraft’s first stories follows a former merchant marine turned morphine addict who recounts a terrible tale! Nice quick read.

Farewell Gif of the Week:
Bergen to Oslo forever.