Tag Archives: fiction

Yes, It’s Happening in Books

For a while now, in light of the recent string of tragedies we’ve seen in the world, I’ve watched fellow authors make a particular comment. (Most of the time on social media.) It can be paraphrased as such:

“None of the things happening in the world right now are happening in books.”

Okay, I can understand where they are coming from, but such a blanket statement feels a touch fantastical. Yes, the violence, destruction, hatred, and bigotry in books have little impact on the real-life lives of people, and yes, there is a solace there. But, to say those things don’t happen in the pages of fiction feels a little naive. Fiction deals with challenging topics all the time. Look at many popular book series on the market today; nothing is off-limits.

Take J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, which began as a children’s book; it danced with bullying, bigotry, racism, and the aftereffects of murder. Harry Potter himself suffers, at the very least, mental abuse at the hands of his aunt and uncle (you could probably argue physical abuse as well.)

The world of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games, a darling of the YA genre, is horrific. The children of an enslaved populace are forced to fight to the death for the entertainment of a wealthy, hedonistic society and its corrupt government. It’s not a pleasant place.

George R. R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire series, which is the most mature of these examples, deals with the consequences following a myriad of tragedies. You name it, and it’s there: violence, rape, murder, torture, war, slavery, incest, rebellion, terrorism, bigotry, regicide, patricide and on and on and on and on. The novels are laden with grim events.

That is how it should be. It is what makes fiction so great. Fiction is a safe space that lets us confront those problems; fiction lets us experience both the beautiful and the terrible. It allows us to see different perspectives that we may never face in our daily lives. That kind of intellectual experience hones us as people. It makes it possible for us to build up generous amounts of empathy, so when real-world problems confront us (and they will, believe me), we will have the tools to face them. As Neil Gaiman so eloquently explained in his essay Little Triggers,

“There are still things that profoundly upset me when I encounter them, whether it’s on the Web or the word or in the world. They never get easier, never stop my heart from trip-trapping, never let me escape, this time, unscathed. But they teach me things, and they open my eyes, and if they hurt, they hurt in ways that make me think and grow and change.”

It does a great disservice to hand-wave away the terrible and sometimes disturbing themes of fiction. If anything, I believe that they should be celebrated. The personal value brought on by these perspectives is unmeasurable to us as a society, and thankfully—unlike real life—if a book ever gets to be too much, we can always close it for a little while.

Neil Gaiman on TriggerWarnings

#TriggerWarning

“But so much of what we read as adults should be read, I think, with no warnings or alerts beyond, perhaps: we need to find out what fiction is, what it means, to us, an experience that is going to be unlike anyone else’s experience of the story.”

Neil Gaiman, Little Triggers

I absolutely loved this line. I highly recommend you read the full essay here. You can pick up Neil Gaiman‘s newest collection of stories, aptly title Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances, pretty much everywhere.

Kobogeddon & “The Stars Were Right”

KOBOGEDDON! AH!! AHHHH!
So last week The Kernel broke a story about Amazon and other ebook retailers selling selling “barely legal” erotic fiction. While there hasn’t been much of a response from Amazon, ebook retailer Kobo immediately reacted by removing all indie books, not just erotic fiction, from its UK store, pending review.

Now this week many indie titles in the US and CA stores are currently unavailable, and the internet is reacting. As an indie author I had to see if this affected me and yes, even my own title: “The Stars Were Right” is currently listed as unavailable. (Despite having zero erotic content.) Now as I jokingly tweeted last week the good news is some lucky Kobo employee will get to read “The Stars Were Right.” Woohoo! I hope they add it to Goodreads. The bad news is if you were planning on buying Stars for your Kobo device it’s currently unavailable.

It’s frustrating, but fret not, I believe in redundancy and if you want to read “The Stars Were Right” there are still a number of ways you can get it:

You’ll also see both iBooks and Barnes & Noble coming online in the next few weeks, and print copies will be available soon! As always there will be more updates as I have them.

Let’s hope Kobo figures this out and we can all move past the #Kobogeddon and get back to reading some good books.