Tag Archives: cthulhu mythos

Cthulhu Mythos 101

Cthulhu Mythos 101

If you’re looking for a decent primer on H.P. Lovecraft’s work and the Cthulhu mythos in general, this video from TedEd and author Silvia Moreno-García is a solid start. It’s surface level—but an easy entry into the world of cosmic horror and not a bad way to spend five minutes.

If you enjoyed that and now want a deeper dive into the man and the mythos—tragedy and all. I highly recommend checking out Frank H. Woodward’s 2008 documentary Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown. It’s fantastic and quite a bit longer. Plus it features a ton of interviews from a variety of authors and artists working in the subgenre.

I’d personally love to see a fresh take on the documentary going into 2020. While Fear isn’t that old—just over ten years—so many more amazing and talented creators have spent time in cosmic horror and added so much over the last decade. Today, the genre as a whole is stronger than it’s ever been and I think their take on the lore and legends would be most welcome.


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Cthulhu the Wimp

Cthulhu The Wimp

At Norwescon, I was happy to meet fellow writer and Seattle Geekly alumni, Michael G. Munz. Michael is another Seattle-based speculative fiction author. While we were at the con he asked me if I’d be interesting writing a geeky guest post for his blog. He left it open to anything I wanted and mentioned something Lovecraftian would be nice. I was more than happy to oblige and had the perfect idea. Hence my post for his Guest Geek section, where I pick on everyone’s favorite elder god, Cthulhu the Wimp. Here’s how the post starts:

We see Cthulhu everywhere. In art, he’s usually rising from the ocean on the back of his ruined city. His narrow glowing eyes stare at the viewer. His face draped with writhing tentacles. Membranous wings stretch from his expansive back. It’s an engaging image and it has seeped into pop culture. From fan art to toys, from toys to plushies, from plushies to video games, Cthulhu is everywhere. His terrifying visage has certainly ubiquitous among Lovecraft’s creations. He’s the de facto and beloved mascot for the mythos. But, what if all this love and terror is based on false presumptions? What if I was to tell you that Cthulhu wasn’t all that terrifying. That he’s more a product of good marketing and overzealous rumormongering? What if Cthulhu is, in fact, a wimp?

You can read the rest of my post over at Michael’s blogI had a lot of fun writing it. Check it out and tell me what you think. Am I right? Is ‪Cthulhu‬ a wimp or am I completely off base? Leave a comment, I want to know!

Also, be sure to check out Michael’s books including his latest: Zeus Is Dead: A Monstrously Inconvenient Adventure (which is currently sitting on my nightstand) and his ongoing near future sci-fi series the New Aeneid Cycle.

Bruce Pennington

Friday Link Pack – Halloween

It’s Halloween and it’s Friday! That means it’s time to share a few spooooky links I’ve found over the last few days. Some of these I mention on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Have a link I should feature in the upcoming link pack? Let me know! All right, let’s get to it.

Writing:

The Biggest Little-Known Influence On H. P. Lovecraft
Lovecraft has influenced numerous horror/thriller/fantasy writers for generations, but who influenced him? The Airship looks into the writer M. R. James.

On Writing Horror And Avoiding Cliches
Writing horror isn’t easy, so Chris Freese has put together this article to help you craft proper scares for your readers.

How To Write A Modern Ghost Story
The Guardian asks, how does one write for an audience that is cynical, yet still wishes to be terrified? It’s a good question and one of the biggest challenges for the modern horror writer.

The Top 20 Greatest Horror Writers of All-Time
Who was the best of the scare? Mania pulls together a list and there’s a lot of big names on it. I’m pretty please to see who came in as number one.

Art:

The Art Of Bruce Pennington
I’m a big fan of 70s cover art. There’s something earnest about it. If you want to see some of the best check out the work of Bruce Pennington. He’s created a wide range of covers from macabre to the futuristic visions of science fiction.

The Bus by Paul Kirchner
I absolutely love this series of comics about a man and a bus. They’re more surreal than scary but they have that sort of Twilight Zone weirdness that makes them perfect for this time of year.

Mayokero Music Video
This music video by Israeli artist Roy Kafri takes classic album covers and brings them to life. It’s not really spooky, but it’s downright cool.

Random:

A Graphic Guide To Cemetery Symbolism
Great infographic from the fine folks over at Atlas Obscura explaining the meaning of common gravestone designs.

10 Scientific Explanations For Ghostly Phenomena
For the skeptics. Listverse explores 10 perfectly rational explanations for the spooky behavior people witness.

When The Stars Are Right…
A site attempting to set a definitive time line to the events portrayed in the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and the Cthulhu Mythos. Mythos fans will love it.

Lovecraft Story of the Week:

The Thing On The Doorstep
A man makes a case why he’s not a murderer despite sending six-bullets through the head of his friend. His bizarre reasoning won’t be what you think.

Gif of the Week:

SpooOOOoooOOOooookky
Have a happy Halloween everyone!