Tag Archives: cosmic horror

The 2017 Lovecraft-Inspired Holiday Gift Guide

The 2017 Lovecraft-Inspired Holiday Gift Guide

December is just around the corner. That means it’s time for my annual Lovecraft-Inspired Holiday Gift Guide! Huzzah! As with previous years, here you can find the perfect curated gifts for the weird-fiction aficionado, cosmic horror fan, or mythos-lover in your life. (Perhaps something special for yourself. You need gifts too.) There’s a lot of great stuff on the list this year, and you’ll find something for all ages and budgets.

As before, I’ve organized the list by category and ordered them by price making it easy to browse. Have a favorite New Weird or mythos-themed item I left off? Leave a comment at the bottom and let everyone know!


❄️ QUICK LINKS ❄️

Books • Music • Apparel • Games • Housewares • Miskatonic


❄️ BOOKS

Hammers on the BoneHammers on Bone by Cassandra Khaw
$6.98 + Free Shipping (Paperback) $3.99 (eBook)
More a novella than a novel, Hammers on Bone introduces the reader to John Persons, a hardboiled private investigator hired by a ten-year-old to kill his abusive stepdad. But things aren’t what they seem, and Persons discovers the truth is much dark then he realized.


The Fisherman by John LanganThe Fisherman by John Langan
$11.08 (Paperback) $6.99 (Kindle)
Winner of the 2016 Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Novel. The Fisherman focuses on a pair of widowers, Abe and Dan, who have found solace in each others company and in fishing. Masterfully written, with an overhanging sense of dread laced with cosmic horror. The result is a sober and somber look at folklore and loss that is dripping with atmosphere.


Winter Tide by Ruthanna EmrysWinter Tide by Ruthanna Emrys
$14.29 + Free Shipping (Hardcover) $15.99 (Paperback) $12.99 (eBook)
A twist on historical fiction, Emrys envisions a world where the once aquatic residents of Lovecraft’s Innsmouth were placed in internment camps far from their seaside homes. Emerging from the camps, Aphra Marsh finds herself critical to the government who imprisoned her as they struggle to keep mankind safe from total destruction.


Borne: A Novel by Jeff VanderMeerBorne: A Novel by Jeff VanderMeer
$14.30 + Free Shipping (Hardcover) $10.40 (Paperback) $12.99 (eBook)
Not specifically Lovecraftian, but certainly weird. VanderMeer is back with a tale of biotech gone awry. In a broken future ruled by a giant bear, a strange creature discovered during a scavenging mission might just tip the balance of power and put people in jeopardy.


Red Litten WorldRed Litten World by K. M. Alexander
$15.00 + Free Shipping (Paperback) $4.61 (eBook)
In the third installment of my Bell Forging Cycle, Caravan Master and now Guardian Waldo Bell returns to the multileveled megalopolis of Lovat. Hired by a wealthy patron to investigate a ritual murder he finds himself once again thrust into a conflict that will lead him up into the cities blood-soaked spires.


Engines of the Broken World by Jason VanheeEngines of the Broken World by Jason Vanhee
$16.99 + Free Shipping (Hardcover) $9.99 (Paperback) $7.09 (eBook)
This is a hard book to pin down. It’s not Lovecraftian, but the themes are there: ministers speak through animal avatars, mothers sing from beyond the graves, and the world is shrinking. There is a palpable sense of dread that carries the story, amplified by Merciful Truth’s wide-eyed innocence and her outlook on a world that is crumbling at its edges.


Not finding a book you like? Check out the books features on one of the previous guides.
2014’s Books2015’s Books • 2016’s Books


❄️ MUSIC & AUDIO

Allicorn's Into The Cold WasteInto The Cold Waste
£5.00 ($6.67 USD) (Digital Download)
Inspired by the Dream Cycle/Dreamlands from Lovecraft’s often ignored Dreamquest of Unknown Kadath, this album from Allicorn feels like the soundtrack for a movie that should exist. It’s haunting and vast, taking you on a journey that reaches from the deck of the White Ship to the spires of Ngranek itself.


The Dukes Of Alhazred by The Darkest of the Hillside ThicketsThe Dukes Of Alhazred by The Darkest of the Hillside Thickets
$10.00 CAD + Shipping (CD) $10.00 CAD (Digital Download)
After a decade the latest album from The Darkest of the Hillside Thickets has arrived and fans of the Lovecraftian themed stone rock band won’t be disappointed. It’s catchy, it’s weird, it’s cosmic horror rock. (Make sure to check out the instrumental track Erich Zahn, it’s quite good.)


The Picture in the House LP - PIGAFETTA'S JOURNAL VARIANTThe Picture in the House LP – PIGAFETTA’S JOURNAL VARIANT
$35.00 + Shipping
Cadabra Records specialize in limited presses of weird fiction audiobook records. Quality and details matter and they make sure the art and presentation are perfect for the collector. This latest release features Lovecraft’s The Picture in the House, read by the indomitable Andrew Leman and scored by the amazingly talented Fabio Frizzi.


The Complete Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft - Special EditionThe Complete Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft – Special Edition
$75.00 + Shipping
New this year from the HPL Historical Society, this collection of all—yes, every single one—of Lovecraft’s audiobooks comes in its own neat USB stick featuring a silhouette portrait of the father of cosmic horror himself. Over 50 hours of Lovecraftian terror, perfect for your holiday.


Not finding any music or audio that interests you? Check out one of the previous guides.
2014’s Music • 2015’s Music • 2016’s Music


❄️ APPAREL

NecronomiCon Providence Sigil PatchNecronomiCon’s Providence Sigil Patch
$3.00 + Shipping
Love patches and haven’t been able to attend NecronomiCon in Rhode Island? Well, Lovecraft Arts & Sciences’ still sell the con’s sigil as a patch. The patch combines the Eye of Providence with the Elder Sign and is embroidered with a gold metallic thread on a black 2″ patch.


Bell Caravan Patch Now Available

Bell Caravans Patch
$5.00 + Shipping (Order by Dec. 10th for Christmas Delivery.)
This beautiful 3″ patch, designed by illustrator Sean Cumiskey, is the perfect way of declaring your loyalty to your beloved caravan master. Put it on your backpack, a tote, or display it on the sleeve of your jacket, just make sure the world knows who you roll with. [From the pages of the Bell Forging Cycle.]


H.P. Lovecraft Cthulhu Hard Enamel PinH.P. Lovecraft Cthulhu Hard Enamel Pin
$10.00 + Shipping
This Lovecraft Cthulhu hard enamel pin measures 1.5″ tall and comes in a deep green that makes the tentacles glisten!  Each pin comes on the backing card with a rubber clutch. (I recommend upgrading to a locking pin back.) Enamel pins aren’t your thing? The same design is available as teeshirts, stickers, and more.


Cthulhu's ChurchCthulhu’s Church Teeshirt
$30.00 + Shipping
I don’t feature many graphic tees. But this design from Gianni Corniola mimicking the style of stained glass you might find in a gothic church was stunning enough I felt it deserved a bit of attention. It’s a step above most cosmic horror tee shirts.


Cthulhu Idol Necklace (Brass)Cthulhu Idol Necklace
$31.95 + Shipping
Since the publishing of Call of Cthulhu, there has been a lot of Cthulhu idol designs. Everyone has their own vision of Uncle Angell’s horror in clay. This little pendant was a unique take. It’s subtle and effective, it feels ancient but it’s not overdesigned. The sort of thing you’d imagine someone driven to madness would create.


Bell Caravans HoodieBell Caravans Hoodie
$55.00 + Shipping
Join the caravan with this classic zip hoodie with a warm fleece lining. The full Bell Caravans logo designed by Sean Cumiskey is on the back, while the small wheel-and-bell symbol resides on the front. Stay warm, look good, fight the Firsts. [From the pages of the Bell Forging Cycle.]


Cthulhu Silicone MaskCthulhu Silicone Mask
$750.00 + Shipping
Elevate your cosplay game with this terrifying realistic silicon mask sculpted by Andrew Freeman. Created with quality in mind this mask moves and jiggles with a stomach-churning reality. Comes in a variety of colors from “flesh” (pictured) to even stranger patterns. It’s the perfect mask to help you fully realize your character.


Not finding any apparel you like? Check out apparel on one of the previous guides.
2014’s Apparel • 2015’s Apparel • 2016’s Apparel


❄️ GAMES

Manimal SanctuaryManimal Sanctuary – iOS
Free! (Digital Download)
Hard to pin down, Manimal Sanctuary is not a game so much as it’s an experience. You play the role of a benevolent creature watching and devouring the emotion as you following the lives of several characters struggling in a world devoured by gibbering monstrosities. Worth the play. Available on Android. (Low-end VR platform like Google Cardboard required.)


Cultist SimulatorCultist Simulator
$14.00 (Digital Download)
Beginnings have to start somewhere, Alexis Kennedy (creator of Sunless Sea) explores the rise of a Lovecraft-esque cult in a strange little card game. I backed it on Kickstarter, played the Alpha, and fell in love. It’s engaging, its story and its world are rich and fresh, and I can’t wait for its release.


Sunless SkiesSunless Skies
$24.99 (Early Access Digital Download)
Failbetter Games takes the sequel to Sunless Sea from the endless night of Fallen London to the very stars themselves. For Queen and Country, you must explore the Victorian steam-punk skies of the High Wilderness as captain of your own spacefaring locomotive.


Resin Cthulhu Mini175mm Resin Cthulhu Miniture
€46.11 ($55.00 USD) + Shipping
Spice up your next tabletop gaming session with the greatest of great old ones. Spice up your players next encounter with The Revenant of R’lyeh, The Motivator of Madness, The Despair from the Deep, The One, The Only, Cthuuuuuullllhuuuuuu. [Crowd goes insane.]


Arkham Horror Premium FiguresArkham Horror Premium Figures
$62.91—$191.52 + Shipping
If you’re like me, you’re obsessed with the Arkham Horror line of boardgames from Fantasy Flight. (I’m a big fan of Mansions of Madness.) Like me, you might not have the time to paint their lovely little figures. Well, lucky for us, they offer a selection of premium painted figures.


Not finding a game you’d enjoy? Check out the games on one of the previous guides.
2014’s Games • 2015’s Games • 2016’s Games


❄️ HOUSEWARES

Cthulelf!Cthulelf!
Free! (Digital Download)
Writer, cartoonist, and all-around rad person Kate Leth created this adorable little monstrosity for your home! As she says: “The old one rises from R’lyeh to wish you a merry and festive holiday season!” Print yours out and make your home a bit more festive. Check out Kate’s other work as well.


Innsmouth Olde AleInnsmouth Olde Ale
$13.00 (Per Six-Pack)
This holiday season, when you crack open a cold one, have yourself a ‘Gansett. The latest from Narragansett Brewing Company’s Lovecraft series is names after Innsmouth and is a toasty and malted English-style Olde Ale. Something you might find served in Gilman House perhaps?


Cedric's Eatery 11oz. MugCedric’s Eatery 11oz. Mug
$16.00 + Shipping (Order by Dec. 10th for Christmas Delivery.)
It’s cold out and you need a new mug. Why not pick one up from Lovat’s own Cedric’s Eatery located in the entresol between Levels Three and Four. An in-between place for in-between folks. Waldo Bell’s latest hangout. Fill your mug with 11 oz. of bad coffee, your favorite tea, or something stronger. [From the pages of the Bell Forging Cycle.]


Nightgaunt StatuetteNightgaunt Statuette
$25.00 + Shipping
Your bookshelf deserves this little guardian of Ngranek. If he protected the infamous mountain on the isle of Oriab deep within the Dreamlands then he can protect your hardcover collection. Let this little fella carry you away, the way his cousins carried away a young H.P. Lovecraft.


Handmade Cthulhu MugHandmade Cthulhu Mug
$40.00 + Shipping
Whether your drink is coffee, tea, beer, wine, or something a bit stronger don’t you believe your beverage of choice deserves a mug as unique as your interests? Why not pick up this (very) limited handmade Cthulhu mug featuring the great old one gripping a human skull in his mouth tentacles, then smugly challenge all beverages.


Eldritch PipesEldritch Pipes
Prices & Availability Varies
These gorgeous pipes come in all shapes, sizes, and styles. They are almost too beautiful to use with each shape being as unique as those who wield them. The pipe pictured is “The Cultist” and is sadly no longer available but there is always a rotating stock so keep your eyes peeled.


Not finding a houseware item you like?
Check out the housewares from one of the previous guides.
2016’s Housewares •


❄️ MISKATONIC UNIVERSITY

Miskatonic Challenge CoinAntarctic Expedition Challenge Coin
$25.00 + Shipping
Challenge Coins have been growing in popularity in fandom (I “blame,” 99% Invisible). So it only makes sense that the Miskatonic University Antarctic Expedition be immortalized in a coin of its own. Make sure you have it on you, you never know who might call for a coin check.


Miskatonic University 1928 Lapel PinSterling Silver Miskatonic University 1928 Lapel Pin
$29.00 + Shipping
If you’re looking for something a bit on the fancy side, consider this 3/4″ sterling silver lapel pin from Badali Jewelry featuring the 1928 Miskatonic University seal. Also available as a tie-tack if you’re one of those people who is forced to wear ties unironically.


Miskatonic Varsity HoodieMiskatonic Varsity Zip Hoodie
$75.00 + Shipping
As a student of Miskatonic University, you’re proud of your alma mater. We all know it. So, why not wear your pride on your shoulders? This high-quality hoodie is the perfect way to show school spirit and comes with a varsity pin of your choice to celebrate your accomplishments.


Not finding any Miskatonic stuff you like?
Check out the Miskatonic University items from one of the previous guides.
2014’s Miskatonic • 2015’s Miskatonic • 2016’s Miskatonic


❄️ Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays! ❄️

Do you have a book, game, or other Lovecraftian product I should feature in next years Lovecraft-Inspired Holiday Gift Guide? Leave a comment below or send me an email!


Dead Drop: Missives from the desk of K. M. AlexanderWant to stay in touch with me? Sign up for Dead Drop, my rare and elusive newsletter. Subscribers get news, previews, and notices on my books before anyone else delivered directly to their inbox. I work hard to make sure it’s not spammy and full of interesting and relevant information.  SIGN UP TODAY →

Finding the Yellow Sign

Hunting The Yellow Sign

In 1895, Robert W. Chambers published The King in Yellow a collection of short stories. Over the years, it has become his seminal work, and due to Lovecraft’s interest in the book and his incorporations of Chamber’s ideas, The King in Yellow inevitably became connected to the mythos. Chamber’s eponymous King in Yellow, became Lovecraft’s Hastur, and the empty streets of dim Carcosa are now as familiar to cosmic horror fans as the sunken city of R’lyeh and the sagging gambrel roofs of Innsmouth.[1]


“Have you found the Yellow Sign?”

— Robert W. Chambers, The Yellow Sign, Chapter 14


For a long time, fans of Chambers’ work have hunted for The Yellow Sign. After all, it is important enough to justify a story within the book. But, unlike Lovecraft who was fond of random sketches, as far as we know Chambers never drew out the symbol. All we have are his descriptions. So what is the Yellow Sign? Did Chambers leave us any clues outside his story?

First, we need to address the Ross Sign. In 1989 Chaosium released The Call of Cthulhu 4th Edition, a role-playing game based on Lovecraft’s mythos. Within the supplemental book, The Great Old Ones, game designer Kevin A. Ross created a striking symbol of The Yellow Sign[2] for his adventure scenario entitled Tell Me, Have You Seen the Yellow Sign?

The Kevin A. Ross interpretation of The Yellow Sign
The Kevin A. Ross interpretation of The Yellow Sign

In the years since Ross’ symbol has become the go-to image whenever anyone evokes The Yellow Sign in popular media. A quick google image search will reveal a few variants, but most follow the same pattern. But, as engaging as it is, it’s important to note that the Ross Sign is not official. It’s not the mark described by Chambers, merely an interpretation by Ross adopted by the community at large. So what is The Yellow Sign? To find out, it’s best to return to the text where we find it described.


“…inside lay a clasp of black onyx, on which was inlaid a curious symbol or letter in gold. It was neither Arabic nor Chinese, nor, as I found afterwards, did it belong to any human script.”

— Robert W. Chambers, The Yellow Sign, Chapter 2


That quote taken from The Yellow Sign, (the fourth story in The King in Yellow), led me back to the original 1895 edition published by F. Tennyson Neely. They’re difficult to find physically, but most have been scanned are now available to read online. While the interiors were sparse, I found a few original covers of the first edition, which had a variety of printings featuring different covers.

The King in Yellow First Edition Covers
The King in Yellow First Edition Covers, starting left First Printing to Third

The books above are ordered by the print run. You’ll note, that each cover bears a similar symbol with strange angles and sweeping curls. At fist glance, it certainly fits the description. It’s script like, and could easily be reminiscent of non-English glyphs. I did some work to pull the icon from the old covers so we could see it without all the filigree.

The Neely The Yellow Sign.
The Neely Sign from the first editions

I’m dubbing this the Neely Sign, and I was ready to accept it as the official version. And I wasn’t alone, I’ve seen it used by others. It’s clear that it’s in the zeitgeist just not as popular as the Ross Sign. It is similar to the description, looking not unlike Arabic letterforms or Chinese hànzì, but it’s clearly not born of either. I can see the appeal. My own rendering of Aklo follows similar patterns, loops, dashes, and dots. (You can see the writing here, just scroll down to book IV, V, and VI.) However, after some digging, I came across another cover; a cover that ruined any assumption of the Neely Sign being our infamous Yellow Sign.

Father Stafford by Anthony Hope, published by F. Tennyson Neely
Father Stafford by Anthony Hope, published by F. Tennyson Neely

Anthony Hope’s Father Stafford features the same mark, and it’s important to note that this book isn’t connected to the mythos. It has been described as a “county-house comedy” which is far different from the grim nature of The King in Yellow. So if that is The Yellow Sign on the cover it would be wildly out of place. So what is it? The connection lies with the publisher. Both Father Stafford and The King in Yellow were published by F. Tennyson Neely under the Neely’s Prismatic Library imprint. You can easily see the letters F, T, and N in the symbol, and the periods clearly indicate initials. Further research found the symbol on other covers as well, including this copy of Master and Man by Tolstoy. So, it seems the Neely Sign was the publisher’s mark and not the official Yellow Sign as many have hoped. So I was back to square one… or was I?


“We talked on, unmindful of the gathering shadows, and she was begging me to throw away the clasp of black onyx quaintly inlaid with what we now knew to be the Yellow Sign.”

— Robert W. Chambers, The Yellow Sign, Chapter 18


I eventually found an old post from 2010 on of my favorite blogs, Propnomicon. It’s a fantastic site focused on documenting the creation of realistic props that evoke Lovecraftian mythos (and horror in general.) Within the post, they suggest that the image on the spine of third first-edition printing (and arguably the most memorable) might be The Yellow Sign. It begged a closer look.

The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers, published by F. Tennyson Neely
The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers, First Edition, Third Printing published by F. Tennyson Neely

It’s a remarkable symbol. You can see a similar object held by the figure. A torch consuming itself, or a burning scepter perhaps? When isolated it looks a bit like a caduceus turned upside down. Could this inverted caduceus, a symbol typically used to represent healing, be a representation of corruption? I think there is merit in that interpretation. After all, Hastur clads himself in yellow, which is opposite on the color wheel of purple, the standard color of royalty. Even Carcosa itself is often shown as a corrupted reflection of our world. Plus when stylized, the inverted torch looks like something you could see embroidered on the stoles and hoods of a Yellow King secret society. It has a symmetry, not unlike the Rebekah’s beehive or the Masonic square and compasses and that is advantageous in a symbol’s use. Effective symbols are easy to reproduce, and while the Ross and Neely signs are interesting, they’re overly complex.

Symbol on the spine of The King in Yellow
Symbol from the spine of Chambers’ The King in Yellow

By this point, I think it will be difficult to uncouple popular culture from the Ross Sign. But, personally, I’ve become a fan of the inverted torch and I will probably go forward using it to represent Hastur within my own work. I like that it has more connection with the original text than the Ross creation and it’s not a misinterpretation like the Neely Sign. Even if it doesn’t fully match the description it’s visually evocative.

While there have been other less grounded interpretations[3], there is no one definite answer. Chambers, for his part, was vague; I’d wager that was intentional. He left the titular Sign open to discussion and that is why it remains undiscovered. For me, that adds to the myth and it helps expand the world of cosmic horror. The mystery becomes a part of the draw and that is something I can appreciate.

Then again, there’s also this strange little mark…

A strange symbol on The King in Yellow's Dedication Page


1 It should be noted that Ambrose Bierce was the first to name both Hastur and Carcosa. They appeared in his short stories Haïta the Shepherd, and An Inhabitant of Carcosa found in his 1893 collection Can Such Things Be? Both stories were drawn upon by Chambers for The King in Yellow.

2 It’s important to note that the Ross Sign that we see today is actually a corruption of Ross’ initial design. Chaosium printed the image both upside-down and backward.

3 See True Detective’s use of the Archimedean spiral and deer antlers, objects more evocative of Ireland’s Newgrange than the standard “symbol from beyond” typically found in cosmic horror.


Dead Drop: Missives from the desk of K. M. AlexanderWant to stay in touch with me? Sign up for Dead Drop, my rare and elusive newsletter. Subscribers get news, previews, and notices on my books before anyone else delivered directly to their inbox. I work hard to make sure it’s not spammy and full of interesting and relevant information.  SIGN UP TODAY →

100 Years of Cosmic Horror

It’s Cosmic Horror’s 100th Birthday

In November of 1916, Howard Phillips Lovecraft published his first short story, The Alchemist, in the United Amateur Press Association. While his commercial work would come later, there is an argument to be made that November should be considered the birth month of cosmic horror as a genre.

Lovecraft wasn’t the first to write weird fiction; even Lovecraft had his influences. Writers like Arthur Machen, Algernon Blackwood, Lord Dunsany, Robert Chambers, and Edgar Allen Poe were all writing of the strange and macabre before ol’ Howie. Most cosmic horror fans will acknowledge their impact, but I think we’d all agree that it was Lovecraft’s writing that became the definitive work of the genre. Lovecraft’s mythos has gone on to influence a myriad of people; it was his stories that encouraged others to delve into writing and working within the genre. His writing helped forge the genre into the beast it is today.

In celebration, I figured it’d be fun to explore the current universe of cosmic horror and look at some of my primary sources for Lovecraftian fiction on the market today. This will be just a tiny sample of the ever expanding universe of weird fiction. If you have recommendations of your own, leave a comment!

The Bell Forging CycleThe Bell Forging Cycle

Why not start with my books? (Buy ’em here.) Don your keff, lace up your boots, and enter my dystopian genre-bending vision of the Territories. A world where humanity is no longer alone and strange creatures inhabit vast multi-leveled megalopolises built upon the backs of drowned cities. A place of violence, where killers stalk narrow streets, and shadowy cults work ancient rituals to awaken forgotten elder gods. Standing in their way is one soul, a road-weary caravan master armed with an antique revolver, a droll wit, and a hardened resolve. Read an excerpt at any of the links below.

The Stars Were Right • Old Broken Road • Red Litten World

Cosmic Horror Small PressCosmic Horror Small Presses

Weird fiction is still alive and well, recently Penguin re-released a limited edition paperback, and a quick search for “Lovecraft” will usher forth all sorts of collections. However, some of the most exciting work in cosmic horror can be found among the small presses.

  • Word Horde

    Publisher of original novels, substantial collections, and some great anthologies, Word Horde, is one of my favorite small presses. The quality of their end product is great, Ross Lockhart and the team there does an excellent job in seeking out new talent and releasing it into the world.

  • Lovecraft eZine Press

    Born from one of the titans of the weird fiction community, the Lovecraft eZine, this cosmic horror press publishes modern mythos and releases some solid anthologies.  Very much worth checking out.

  • Dark Regions Press

    Specializing in horror and dark fiction since 1985, this indie publishing house serves up all manners of terrors from some fairly big names. If you want something collectible, make sure to check out their special hardcover editions.

  • Hippocampus Press

    This small press focuses on collected works from cosmic horrors greats, men like Ramsey Campbell, Lovecraft himself and Clark Ashton Smith. They also delve into nonfiction as well, featuring work from scholars like S. T. Joshi.

Cosmic Horror PodcastsCosmic Horror Podcasts

Some of my favorite podcasts focusing on Lovecraft and cosmic horror.

  • Miskatonic Musings

    While Lovecraftian fiction is often at the center of discussion, this podcast covers a wide variety of horror in general as well as other strange and often weird tangents.

  • People’s Guide to the Cthulhu Mythos

    This podcasts focuses on deeper dives into specific categories within the Cthulhu Mythos and cosmic horror.

  • Northwest Horror

    While not specific to Lovecraftian literature, the crew at NWH does excellent work exploring the ever expanding world of horror. (They also occasionally host a trivia night in Portland, OR. So if you’re ever in the area, check ’em out.)

  • The H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast

    Chris and Chad take on a new story each week and get into the nitty gritty details. They also have some excellent readings available on their site.

  • The Black Tapes

    This serialized docu-drama follows Alex Reagan and Dr. Strand as they investigate a series of strange recordings, the titular Black Tapes.

  • Limetown

    Ten years ago, over three hundred men, women, and children disappeared from a small town in Tennessee, never to be heard from again. What happened to Limetown?

Other Cosmic Horror NovelistsCosmic Horror Novelists

This list could get long, so I will keep it to novelists of whom I have read and who’s books I’ve enjoyed. If there’s someone I missed (highly likely) or a writer that you’d like to recommend (also highly likely,) leave a comment! Links attached to the author’s name will go to their website or blog; book links will go to Amazon. (But you should buy from your local indie shop.) Also, don’t forget to leave a review!


This has been just a tiny sampling of the world of cosmic horror as it exists today. The genre hasn’t gone away. If anything, we see its influence grow more and more in all forms of popular culture. It has reached beyond books and into movies, table-top games, toys, comic books, television shows, and video games. The fundamental terror brought by the fear of the unknown and the creatures that lurk in spaces beyond is something that draws readers even today. So join me in wishing Cosmic Horror a lovely one-hundredth birthday! It’s been a great one hundred years, and here’s to a hundred more!

Cheers!


Did I miss something? Have a favorite writer, podcast, or small press house that I missed?Leave a comment and let us know!

H. P. Lovecraft

The Strongest Kind Of Fear

“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear. And the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.”

H.P. LovecraftSupernatural Horror in Literature


It’s been a while since I posted a quote, and since I’m close to launching my next Lovecraftian urban fantasy novel, I figure it’d be appropriate to post a quote from one of Lovecraft’s own works. This line also inspired the title for the Lovecraft documentary, Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown. If you haven’t seen it, I recommend checking it out.