Tag Archives: art

Overlooked Details, An Artist's Journey - by Scott Wilson, Starring Kari-Lise AlexanderOverlooked Details, An Artist's Journey - by Scott Wilson, Starring Kari-Lise Alexander

Slight Delay With Overlooked Details

UPDATE: It’s live. Watch it here!

The internet is a fickle and restless monster, sometimes everything seems to be going swimmingly and in the next moment you’re having dropped connections and nothing is working. As a result we’ve seen a little delay in the documentary short, Overlooked Details, that I mentioned last week. It’s being fix and it should be available soon. Sorry about the delay! I know a few people have been asking. I’ll post when it’s live. (It’s worth the wait.)

Overlooked Details, An Artist's Journey - by Scott Wilson, Starring Kari-Lise AlexanderOverlooked Details, An Artist's Journey - by Scott Wilson, Starring Kari-Lise Alexander

Coming Soon: Overlooked Details

Been keeping this under wraps for a while, but the time has come! I’m happy to announce the upcoming release of Overlooked Details, An Artist’s Journey a documentary film by Scott Wilson focusing on my amazing and talented wife, Kari-Lise Alexander. The 15 minute documentary will be available to watch next Monday, February 2nd. I couldn’t be more excited.

Last November Kari-Lise was approached by Scott, a local filmmaker and creator of the Emergence Series. It was initially supposed to be pretty short, but over the course of the filming it eventually grew into a 15 minute focus on Kari-Lise’s journey, the creation of art, and the struggles associated within. I cannot wait to share it with everyone. Scott is an incredible filmmaker and really captured Kari-Lise’s story, her passion, and her philosophy. It’s beautiful, it’s encouraging, and I’ll be posting it when it launches.

Until it launches, enjoy the poster:

Overlooked Details, An Artist's Journey - by Scott Wilson, Starring Kari-Lise Alexander

A B S A R O K A

Friday Link Pack 01-16-2014

Friday! It’s time to share a few links I’ve found over the last few days. Some of these I mention on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Have a link I should feature in the upcoming link pack? Click here to email me and let me know! All right, let’s get to it.

Writing:

10 Things Teenage Writers Should Know About Writing
Grand master Scalzi shares some advice to young writers. From writing every day to dealing with rejection. Good stuff.

Sky Gazing
Hugh Howey with some straight talk on indie publishing, publishing, dealing with the market, writing, etc. Read it, easily my favorite article of the week. It also goes along splendidly with my article from last week: Ignore The Market. Tell The Story You Want To Tell.

Hey Video Game Developers, We’re Not Idiots
I am throwing this in writing because I feel like it’s a good critique of storytelling as a whole. Cara Ellison explains why sometimes beating your reader/player over the head isn’t necessary and is often… well, a bit over the top. Made me pull back and evaluate some of my decisions.

The Daily Routines of Famous Creative People
We have looked at famous creative’s routines before, but it’s nice to see them all laid out like this. How does your own schedule compare? (Thanks to Steve for the submission.)

Art:

Women Trying To Sleep Unsuccessfully In Western Art History
For hundreds of years women in art have been trying to take a break and catch some Zs. For whatever reason no one wants to let them. Art is weird.

Rovina Cai’s Illustration
Fell in love with Rovina Cai’s style over the holiday and I am sure you will as well. Make sure you check out her Facebook page as well. Lots of good stuff.

A B S A R O K A
Beautiful and haunting short shot by Duncan Wolfe for the Collective Quarterly. A love letter to Livingston Montana… well all of Montana really.

Random:

Watch Bill Gates Drink Water That Used To Be Human Poop
The headline you never expected to read. (Come on, click it, you know you want to.)

5 Of The World’s Most Dangerous Chemicals
Great little video that goes into details explaining some of the craziest chemicals ever invented by humans.

Robots Are Starting To Break The Law And Nobody Knows What To Do About It
Ecstasy and counterfeit hungarian passports… robots know how to party.

Lovecraft Story of the Week:

The Challenge from Beyond
H.P. Lovecraft, Robert E.Howard, C.L. Moore, A. Merritt, and Frank Belknap Long all take a crack at telling one whole story, writing only one chapter each. Good fun.

Gif of the Week:

Hey, what's going on?

This is the most detailed map yet of our place in the universe

Friday Link Pack 09/05/2014

First Friday of September! That means it’s time to share a few interesting links I have found throughout the week. Some of these I mention on Twitter, if you’re not already following me there, please do! Have a link I should feature in the upcoming link pack? Let me know!

Old Broken Road:

The sample chapter of Old Broken Road is now available to read for free! Simply hit up: oldbrokenroad.com. Enjoy! Expect a release date announcement any day now. You heard it here first.

Writing:

Book Publishing, Not Fact-Checking
Here’s something that will probably not come as a surprise: most non-fiction books are not fact checked. Well, maybe it should come as a surprise, but are we really surprised by stuff like this anymore?

Let’s Talk About Margins
Many publishers ignore the layout of books but layout is important. In my opinion it is as important as a good editor and a good cover. In this article, Craig Mod explains why you need to pay attention to the margins. (Thanks to Gus for sharing this.)

Generative eBook Covers
A lot of early books didn’t have covers. Not in the way we think of them today. New York Public Library has embarked on creating generative eBook covers. Obviously, these won’t replace a custom cover, but the result are pretty cool.

The Future Library
What if you could contribute a book to a library that won’t be available for one hundred years? You’d never know what people thought. You’d be writing for writings sake. Well, it’s happening, and Margaret Atwood is the first contributor.

The Creative Process
Self-doubt is something every author struggles with, but pushing past it is what separates the successes from the failures.

Art:

500 Years Of Female Portraits In Western Art
Found this video showing the progression of the female portrait very fascinating. Really appreciate the work that went into this. It’s interesting to see history presented this way.

2014 Burning Man Photoset
Stunning imagery from this year’s Burning Man snapped by photographer John K. Goodman. (It’s Burning Man, so I’ll assume you know these probably aren’t totally safe-for-work.)

Art Is A Way
Do yourself a favor and check out these beautiful paper-cut sculptures from artist Elsa Mora. Really fun, detailed work.

Random:

This Is The Most Detailed Map Yet Of Our Place In The Universe
So the Milky Way is our galaxy. But did you know we’re apart of a supercluster of galaxies? Meet Laniakea, our local supercluster containing more than one-hundred thousand galaxies.

Seven-Foot Wide House For Sale In London
Looking to move to London? Need a small place to call your own? How about a narrow place? How about a REALLY narrow place?

Mystery Of How Rocks Move Across Death Valley Lake Bed Solved
Remember those strange rocks that move across the desert? Well, science has discovered how that crazy phenomenon happens!

Lovecraft Story of the Week:

The Hound
A pair of grave robbers choose the wrong grave. Fun fact: this is the first mention of Arab Abdul Alhazred and the Necronomicon.

Gif of the Week:
BFF

Mark Twain at his writing desk

Shut up and write!

I over plan. I mentioned in a previous blog post that I like to plan—and there is nothing wrong with that—but sometimes I take it to an extreme. When I wrote my first manuscript, Coal Belly, I learned a valuable lesson about my tendency to over plan.

It started with a map. After I had finished it apparently I needed to draw out the deck plans for the riverboat central to the plot. When that was finished, I had to draw a new, highly detailed map of the capital city where a section of the story took place. That obviously wasn’t detailed enough, so I needed to divide it up and name all the neighborhoods. Then I needed to draw out the various symbols of the various factions within that capital city. Next, I needed to… no…no, no, no, no, no.

NO.

I didn’t need to do half that. Eventually, I realized I was spending so much time creating busy work for myself that I was getting nothing done. I was working on collateral and not on the actual story itself. That’s a problem. Research is fine when it’s crucial, but there comes a time when it begins to get in the way. Learning to recognize when I was doing something necessary, and when I was just spinning my wheels was essential for me to get things done. I had to quit working on all the tangential stuff and focus on the work itself. The actual work. I needed to just shut up and write.

I have to remind myself about this daily. I need to separate the busy work from real work. There’s always a blog post to write, a character to outline, an article to read, a comment to compose, a map to draw, a playlist to assemble, a twitter conversation to follow, etc. The list is endless, and it can get in the way and keep you from finishing. (Rule #2) It’s different for each of us, but somewhere inside, we all know if what we are doing is needed to completing our project or if it’s just a distraction.

Whenever you catch yourself doing something that isn’t what you want to be working on, do a double check. Decide if it’s really worth your time or if you should just sit down, shut up, and write.

Fan Art Highlight – Sean Cumiskey

The Shopkeep and the Umbra by Sean Cumiskey
“The Shopkeep and the Umbra” by Sean Cumiskey

Do yourself a favor and click on the image above or click here and see this illustration larger. It needs to be see at full resolution. This piece of fan art comes from Sean Cumiskey and is entitled “The Shopkeep and the Umbra” and as you can see it’s incredible.

His attention to detail within this piece is astounding and the charcoal style really captures the mood of the prologue. (Which you can read right over here.) Note the reverse name of “Russel & Sons Optics” in the window, the way the umbra is holding the straight razor, the details and highlights in Thad’s eyes, and even the rain on the windows. It’s so well done!

Huge thanks to Sean! I love seeing readers artistic interpretations of Stars. Make sure you check out more of Sean’s work at his website: seancumiskey.com. Sean is also available for freelance projects and commissions. As you can see he’s incredibly talented.

Here’s a video showing how he created this scene. Make sure you view it full screen and in HD:


Let me know what you think of “The Shopkeep and the Umbra” in the comments! Does it match with your imagination? What’s your favorite part?

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I’m going to keep highlighting art from “The Stars Were Right” fans and readers and sharing it with everyone! If you have any fan art submissions please email them to me at: hello@kmalexander.com with the subject line: “Stars Fan Art Highlight.” Include any links to a website showing your work so I can share that as well and let me know if people can buy your piece/prints/etc.